Continuing Education – The Benefits of Taking Night Classes

Are you considering night classes at a local college, because this is the only free time you have? Another option to consider is online night classes, which can be done from the comfort of your own home. Regardless, here are some of the top benefits of taking night classes for higher education:

  • Night classes may have a smaller pool of students, according to Career Lifestyle Journal, which means a better ratio of student to teachers.
  • According to the same report, a large percent of nighttime students are working adults, which give them the opportunity to socialize and network in their own age group.
  • Students can still make a living while completing higher education and securing a competitive advantage.

Some of the disadvantages of taking night classes include sleep debt, which could directly affects one’s health. This is especially true if the student works a full time job during the daytime. Nevertheless, it’s imperative that students reserve 6-8 hours of sleep daily and go for annual checkups with their physician. This is feasible through discipline and a set routine. As an example, college students can follow these strategies:

Remove Distractions – such as social media and the constant beeps of technology. You may still want to stay in touch with family and friends, and this can be narrowed down to a few minutes that are set each day. This can improve your job performance as well. Remember, the better you perform, the more likely you will be to be recognized by employers.

Set a Schedule – and stick to this. Do you get off at 5 pm and reach home by 6? This is a random example, however dinner, shower and then bed can be scheduled until 6 hours later. Getting up in the middle of the night to take night classes may seem infeasible at first, but students with a goal to make a better life will find this to be more of a routine in the long run.

Remember Goals – if you’re feeling weary about nighttime classes, remember the long-term benefits of these short term sacrifices.

Forbes magazine and Career Builder both have studies agreeing that college graduates earn an estimated $1 million dollars more than high school graduates over their lifetime. In addition, college graduates are most likely to be chosen over those with a high school diploma alone. This is because online business degree holders are regarded as owning more skillsets and critical thinking skills, which are essential in the workplace.

Registered Nursing Continuing Education

The completion of two to four years of education, with an associate degree or a baccalaureate degree, is a basic requirement to become a Registered Nurse. The field of nursing is wide open, because of a shotage of muc needed nurses in hospitals and other venues across the country and the world.

There are many types of courses and providers available. The common goal of these courses is to prepare the future nurses for initial entry into practice and RN licensure [procedure of which differs from state to state in the US] and work their way up the professional ladder.

The candidates should complete a minimum number of hours of CE courses to qualify for licensure. They are also expected to pass the NCLEX-RN® examination. This examination measures the competencies needed to practice nursing safely and effectively as a newly licensed entry-level RN. NCLEX-RN® is used by Boards of Nursing all over the US and its territories.

If a nursing aspirant had her education abroad, she has to take the RNCGFNS, which provides a certification platform and includes a test of English proficiency, and an examination designed to prepare for the NCLEX-RN® examination. The CGFNS certificate program, which is only available for RN candidates, is well-established and serves as a requirement by 42 Boards of Nursing.

The Florida Nurses Association says in the home page of its official website http://www.floridanurse.org, ‘Nursing is not a job. It is a profession requiring specialized knowledge and skills’. A Continuing Education program is the best way to acquire this.

The Advantages and Disadvantages of Continuing Education

Pursuing higher education will come with great benefits, as well as pitfalls. This article will examine both to help you choose.

The top advantages of continuing education include:

The Bureau of Labor Statistics depicts that individuals earn more with each educational attainment. As an example, compare the following median weekly earnings by educational attainment:

· Workers with Associates Degrees – $785/week

· Workers with Bachelor’s Degrees – $1066/week

· Workers with Master’s Degrees – $1300/week

· Workers with Doctoral Degrees – $1624/week

Furthermore, unemployment rates decrease the higher up the educational ladder one climbs.

Another study by Global Business Hub showcased how heading back to school opens up employees’ eyes about new technological and work trends. Interacting with other leaders, or soon to be leaders in the business also provide key networking opportunities that may come in handy in the future. Ultimately, higher education provides a competitive advantage over one’s peers or in the workplace.

Continuing education is also convenient and completely feasible, given that online colleges are plentiful, and can also be completed with reputable colleges offline. Working adults can pursue new goals or even make a career switch – on their own schedule.

The top disadvantages of continuing education include:

More on student’s plate – in addition to work and family life, students returning to an online degree school in adulthood will need to squeeze in time for school as well. Taking on more than one can handle seems like a recipe for disaster. However, many working adults make this work by creating a schedule and carving a disciplined mindset. Inform family and friends to chip in, or forego partying for a period of time until the goal of higher education is complete.

A strain on finances – while many working adults have the advantage to earn while they learn, higher education is not considered to be a drop in the bucket. Fortunately, there are many programs to help offset these added expenses including student loans, as well as affordable monthly payments offered by some colleges.

Recreation Takes a Back Seat – a study by the Global Business Hub stated that adult students are less likely to take vacations. However, this shouldn’t deter one from pursuing higher education, as reminders constantly exist that this situation is temporary.

In the end, despite the cons of continuing education, the balance is tipped in students’ favor in the long run. As a reminder, this includes higher pay, better job security, and increased confidence.

Continuing Education Is a Necessity – That Doesn’t Mean It Has to Be Tedious

Therapists who see continuing education as something just to get through are missing out. LMFTs (Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist) LPCCs (Licensed Professional Clinical Counselors) and LCSWs (Licensed Clinical Social Worker) are required to maintain current skills by completing continuing education (CEUs) requirements in order to renew their licenses.

This isn’t just a requirement, it’s an opportunity! These precious hours are time for the therapist to regroup, to recharge the batteries renew motivation, learn new skills and update established ones.

Online or Classroom teaching

Therapists can gain CEUs with self-study, online and live trainings and workshops. While it’s easy to see the appeal of online courses (convenient, on your schedule, in your jammies) “live” classes offer so much more than basic information.

Interactive learning

By attending live classes and workshops, therapists have the opportunity to discuss and get clarification, “try on” ideas with colleagues and see the material in a relatable, communicative way. Small groups are especially helpful when the opportunity to “learn it, see it, do it” is offered. This way of learning brings the material to life and offers practical and efficient ways of learning.

Meeting colleagues

Attending live classes also offers you the chance to network with colleagues while you learn together. Being a therapist can be an isolating experience, so talking with your peers, sharing ideas and community is essential. CEU classes provide an ideal opportunity to network, collaborate and educate yourself while contributing to the group as a whole.

Bring Theory to life

Live CEU workshops offer the unique opportunity to see material in action. Understanding a theory is great, knowing how to apply it is essential! As therapists learn and actually practice new skills, they contribute to the well-being of every client they see.

Don’t Put It Off

It’s easy to put off your required Continuing Education (CEU) requirements, but that leads to a rushed experience as your renewal date looms. Help yourself and your practice by getting those CEU dates on your calendar now. While there are legal minimum required hours, there is no maximum to the amount of learning from which a therapist can benefit. You don’t give the “bare minimum” to your clients, why settle for it in your CEUs?

Get motivated

Live classes allow you to be part of a bigger community that will support your work, motivate you to be stretch and that needs your contribution of energy. Online IS convenient, but it’s also one more place of isolation, and often, frustration. Get out of your jammies, go see your colleagues, and get excited about your meaningful and challenging work again!

The Importance of Continuing Education

While these 23 million individuals represent the very core of an emerging society that is more inclined to studying and learning, the remaining individuals are excluded from these learning experiences due to reasons of time, cost, or even personal issues.

Over the last few years, the number of adults who are continuing with their education has increased tremendously. This term “continuing education” describes the opportunity and process of learning new skills and acquiring knowledge that is far superior to what we are taught during our formal schooling years.

Most people opt for continued education to further their knowledge base and even their employability.

Continuing Education vs. Traditional

Usually, what we learn in all of those long, arduous years of our formal schooling are just basic skills that are good enough to help us start working, but not good enough to take us further in our careers, especially with the rapid changes and advancements in technology that demands for a more sophisticated and educated workforce.

Students who participate in continuing their education are generally working professionals who seek to further advance and promote their intellectual capabilities while still working. Since their time is divided between studies and full-time work, they have to be extremely motivated in order to succeed. One of the biggest characteristics that distinguish students who are participating in continuing education is their tendency to relate the lessons that they learn in class to their work experience.

Instructors must have the proper and appropriate practical experience and knowledge in order to address the issues and concerns of these special students. Students involved in continuing education can be very selective when it comes to choosing their courses. The courses that they choose have to be in some way relevant to their work and should be able to benefit them. If the right course is chosen, it can benefit you a great deal both educationally and professionally.

More and more adults are now engaged in continuing education that leads to formal qualifications that provide them with the adequate knowledge pertaining to a certain area of study. Furthermore, continuing education also provides us with a certain pride of accomplishment as we take our courses.

Offering an affordable, faster, and definitely more focused means of acquiring career or personal objectives, continuing education credentials can be put on resumes and presented anywhere as evidence of the individual’s professional studies.

The Importance of ‘Continuing Education’ in the Workplace

A skilled workforce will always result in increased economic productivity. Here is how continuing education benefits the working force:

o A more skilled workforce is always more productive – These days, skills and education are seen as the most important elements of the employability and income potential of a candidate. Since the economy has shifted to one that values an educated workforce more than an uneducated workforce, employers are now seeking both educated and skilled workers. The demand for continuing education has thus increased twofold.

o Continuing education helps employers retain better employees while remaining as competitive as ever – A more educated employee will always be more productive, so companies have now started hiring employees who are continuing with their education. Continuing education can be seen as a way to retain the better, more educated employees.

With the rapid advancement of the information technology sector, continuing education will not be confined to only physical space. Distance learning through interactive media will form a major part of continuing education. The internet will also play a huge role in delivering the course materials to the students.

A virtual course that is aimed at extending an individual’s knowledge beyond those formal years of education has now become reality. With respect to all of this development in the field of continuing education, we have only one question to ask: how much further can continuing education go?